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COLLEGE 



7NEWS 



Vol. 3. No. 1. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1903 



Price, 5 Cents 



MISS HUTSINPILLAR'S SPEECH. 

MADE AT THE FIRST MEETING OF THE 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

Yon have listened to the reading of the 
Constitution and By-Laws of this great 
Association, and, knowing that you are all 
members of it, you would probably like 
to know something of its history and pur- 
pose. 

Ninctecn-four is the last class in College 
to remember the real beginnings of this 
Association, but long before nineteen-four 
ever thought of College there was an -un- 
dercurrent of feeling among the Wellesley 
girls that they ought to govern themselves, 
not because the Faculty Government was 
not good enough, but because they felt that, 
as women soon to go out into the world, 
they needed this training to give them 
self control. In ninety-nine this feeling 
led the girls then in College to try a sys- 
tem of proctoring to enforce the rules 
which the Faculty made. But this was 
not a great success. The girls did not feel 
the responsibility of enforcing rules which 
they did not make. The system continvied 
in use, however, in some of the houses 
through nineteen-four's first year, but 
meanwhile a movement for the present 
method of government began. 

These Seniors were Freshmen then but 
I am sure any of them can tell you of the 
enthusiasm of that year. Mass meeting 
after mass meeting was held, first to dis- 
cuss whether we should ask for Student 
Government, then to consider the Con- 
stitution , and finally to adopt it. At last 
Frances Hughes, our first President, and 
Louise Allen, the Secretary, walked for- 
ward to the table in the front of the chapel 
and signed their names after those of Dr. 
MacKenzie, President Hazard and Dean 
Pendleton, to the Agreement, which gives 
us the power, until we abuse it, to govern 
ourselves. 



You may wonder why it was that a body 
of students, who had almost nothing to 
complain of in their way of government, 
should seek to add anything more to their 
already busy lives. As we have already 
said, the consideration that sooner or later 
they must judge for themselves what was 
best for them as individuals and in com- 
munities led them to feel that self govern- 
ment in College would be of value to them 
for training, and, in the words of the 
Agreement, "would make for growth in 
character and power." But there was 
also another reason for asking for Student 
Government. If you will look back into 
history or into the characters of those 
about you, you will see that in every one 
there is a love of independence for its own 
sake. It was mainly this love of independ- 
ence which inspired Mary Leavens and 
those who worked with her, to procure 
for Wellesley Student Government and 
independence. 

But this independence means two 
things — liberty and responsibility; the 
liberty to make our own laws, to have 
them enforced by our own officers, and to 
judge of infractions, ourselves; the respon- 
sibility of making good laws which tend 
to secure liberty and order and the best 
conditions for scholarly work; for keeping 
these laws and for supporting the Asso- 
ciation in all possible ways. 

Very little need be said of the liberty 
which we enjoy under Student Govern- 
ment, we are all made aware of that every 
day of the year. We appreciate it when 
it comes to voting in Association meeting, 
when our work makes it necessary for us 
to study after ten, or when we find our- 
selves enjoying the privilege of registra- 
tion; in every way that reminds us of our 
independence, we appreciate it. But we 
do not always appreciate the abuse of 
which it is capable. Like every other 
good thing, liberty may be subject to 
great abuse, and whenever it is not modi- 
fied by order, it is likely to be exaggerated 
into selfish license. The one great thing 
to remember in this liberty of ours is, that 
it is community, not individual freedom; 
we must use it with regard to what is 



best for the majority, not for the few. 

Now it is certain that the main purpose 
of the majority of students in coming 
to College, is to increase their scholarship. 
Anything which detracts from that main 
purpose is an abuse of liberty. We have, 
in our independence, granted to ourselves 
some unique privileges, which, if they are 
used too frequently tend to make against 
the "maintenance of the best conditions 
for scholarly work." For instance, we 
have abandoned the old ten o'clock rule 
which called for lights out at that hour. 
We did this because we felt that College 
girls were capable of judging for them- 
selves whether it was necessary for them 
to sit up to study or whether, by so doing, 
they would injure their health. I regret 
to say that this privilege has been abused. 
Girls have sat up not to study but to have 
a good time and by so doing they have kept 
their houses noisy and have disturbed 
others who were trying to sleep or to study. 
This merely shows that at times the girls 
have forgotten that it is their duty to 
preserve the best conditions for study 
which the majority demand. 

I am glad to say that this has not been 
general and I feel that this year, as we 
grow more accustomed to our independ- 
ence, the abuse will be lessened. 

Another privilege by which we have 
especially favored ourselves is that of 
registration now granted to all four 
classes, a privilege which before the 
time of Student Government belonged 
only to the two upper classes. The abuse 
of this, that is the too frequent use of it, 
injures, in the first place, the one who 
abuses it, by lowering her own scholarship, 
but, in the end, with a number of others 
abusing the same privilege, it injures the 
College by lowering the scholarship of 
Wellesley itself. These are the two main 
privileges which are liable to misuse and 
of which, for that reason, we should be 
most careful. The only way to avoid 
the abuse of this liberty is to remember 
that ours is a liberty under government, a 
liberty with which order and temperance 
are correlated. 

(Continued on Page 3.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews, 

Press of n. A. Linoscy & Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a year to resident subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to C. W. ROGERS. Business Editor COL- 
LECH NEWS, Wellesley, Mass. 



Editor-in-Chief, Carolyn P. Nelson, 1905. 
■ Associate Editor, Helen R. Norton, 1905. 
Literary Editors, 
Martha Hale Shackford, '96 Mabel Seagrav.e, 1905 
Mary Esther Chase, '95 Ellen Manchester, 1905 

Managing Editors, 
Annie V. Luff, 1904 
Cora L. Butler, 1904 Edith Fox, 1904 

Assistant Business Manager, Edith Fox. 



Welcomes seem to be the order of the day 
and the News greets its new readers very 
heartily. "Loyalty" has been the word 
given the new students in all the greetings 
they have received from the various or- 
ganizations of the college, — from the Chris- 
tian Association and from the Student 
Government Association. And we feel 
that in welcoming you to college, 1907, 
we should urge your loyal support of the 
College papers. A College publication 
cannot subsist on the efforts of an edito- 
rial board ; it must have the financial and 
literary support of the whole student body. 
A surprisingly small percentage of under- 
graduates and Alumna? subscribe to the 
Wellesley Magazine and the College News. 
Last-year the subscription list was so small 
that the death of the College papers was 
imminent. It was only by laying the 
matter before the class presidents, by a 
general vote of the classes and by a re- 
canvassing of the College that this calamity 
was averted. To most of us, in our think- 
ing moments, it would be ignominious to 
do away with the College papers, yet the 
only way to prevent such an evil is for 
each girl to give her aid as far as she can 
to the support of these papers. 

Owing to lack of space the Alumna? 
Notes and the Parliament of Fools have 
been omitted in this number. 



We are showing a remarkably good 

SILK BELT, 

with the latest designs in buckles and 
back piece for $1.00. 

The Red Silk Belts mounted with gun 
metal and gold-plated buckles are 
very stylish and the price is only $1.00 

Also Wellesley Flag Pins, 25c and 50c. 

41 Summer Street, 



Next door Hovey's, 
Boston. 



(Masse s 



It is a fact that our Glasses combine 
the most accurate construction with 
perfect adjustment at a saving to you 
of from 10 to 20 per cent. Is this 
worth your consideration ? 

Pinkham <& Smith, 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS, 

288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



The Christian Association Reception. 

The annual Christian Association Re- 
ception to the Freshmen was held in College 
Hall, Saturda)' evening, September the 
igth. Each Freshman was taken under 
the protection of a sophomore or upper- 
class girl by whom she was introduced to 
the rest of the company. It was part of 
the program to present the Freshmen with 
souvenir cards on which they might write 
the names of the various acquaintances of 
the evening. About o'clock when the 
fun and merriment were at their height 
there were short addresses of welcome from 
the stairway. In a few cordial words Mrs. 
Durant expressed her wish that the coming 
four years might be bright and profitable 
ones for the new students, and that in 
learning to love the best they might be 
prepared for lives of usefulness. Presi- 
dent Hazard then extended a hearty wel- 
come to the new students and spoke of 
the growth of the College and the home 
life. Miss Eaton welcomed the Freshmen 
to the Christian Association as the real 
heart of the College. In Miss Hutsin- 
pillar's" speech of welcome, 1907 was re- 
minded of the superiority of the Student 
Government Association over all other 
organizations in College in that every 
individual member of the class had a part 
and share in that organization immediately 
on her entrance to College. 

The singing of " 'Neath the Oaks," 
"Alma Mater," and the Wellesley cheer 
completed the evening's entertainment. 

Miss Hazard, Miss Pendleton, Miss 
Eaton, Miss Hutsinpillar and Miss Hunter 
received in the Browning Room ; Miss 
Orr, Miss Crocker, Miss Kimball, Miss 
Clause and Miss Stephenson acted as 
ushers. 

Refreshments were served on the first 
and second floors. 



Ladies' Neckwear Dept. 



Beautiful 




Novelties 



Coming in Every Week. 

THE FASHIONABLE NECKWEAR OF 
THE DAY ALWAYS IN STOCK. 



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F. W. B, SELLORS & GO, 

172 Tremont Street, Boston. 
Agents for the 

FORSYTHE WAIST, 

ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS 

NOTMAN, 

384 Boylston St. and 3 Park St., Boston. 
Also 1286 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 

SPECIAL RATES TO WELLESLEY STUDENTS 



Wellesley Steam Laundry, 

BLOSSOM STREET. 

All kinds of Fancy Ironing at reasonable 
prices. Collections made Monday and Tues- 
day; deliveries, Thursday and Saturday. 



Agents for KNOX Hats. 

HALL & HANCOCK, 

Women's Hats and Furs. 

Sole Boston Agents for 

KNOX Renowned Hats. 

Furs Received on Storage Insured Against All 
Loss. 

407 Washington Street. 



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If your Dealer does not sell you this 
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Every Clasp has the name JMK- 
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GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass. 




COLL E O E N E W S 



MISS HUTSINPILLARS SPEECH. 

H,,i |||,. foundation of government is always responsibility 
In the case of our own Association, the responsibility is demo 
cratic, ii rests upon each individual member of the Association, 
In coming to College we join the Association, there is no pledging 
of ourselves t<> it . there is n>> way out of it, each one is subject i<> 
Siu. Kin Government an. I therefore, each one is a member ..I' 
ih,. Association, It is tin- duty of each In support the Ass<>- 
ciation financially, to support it by her presence at meetings, by 
conscientious voting, by observing and helping to enforce rules, 
hi fact, by having the interests of Student Government at heart 
ami by doing everything in her power to make Student Govern 
mer i | [deal We i an not say that we will elect our officers and 
leave t" them all responsibility for preserving order, for seeing 
that rules arc obeyed, and Eor getting a quorum, the officers 
can ,|,, only a certain amount, it remains will, the body of the 
Association really to accomplish these things. 

The secret of the success of Student Government is indivi- 
dual responsibility ami quiet enthusiasm. Until we feel this 
we cannot expect success. 

The girls who live on the Campus have probably the best op- 
portunity for insuring success ami guarding against failure be- 
cause they arc for the most part upper class e,irls who have had 
on: tw .-. >r three \ . irs ixpcriehc: md it is thvir duty t: show 
by example that they know and appreciate the necessity of 
individual responsibility. 

But by saying that the girls on the Campus have more reason 
to realize this, i kU> not mean that it is not just as true for the 
girls in the Village. As a matter of fact it is even more true if 
possible. There the girls are so far removed from most of the 
officers of Student Government that- there is no constant 
surveillance, hence it depends upon individuals more than ever 
to see that the best interests of the Association are served. We 
want you girls wdio do live in the Village to realize that Wellesley 
is just as much yours, and that Student Government is just as 
much yours as it is anyone's. It depends upon you to make 
Student Government an ideal government just as much as it 
does upon anv Senior in College. 

You are fortunate in having a Vice-president, who, realizing 
how useful she could be in the Village, has given up the pleasures 
of spending her last year on the Campus, in order to be near you 
where you can find her easily to consult with her. But 
whether you are in the Village or on the Campus you are 
all members of the same Association, enjoying the same priv- 
ileges and bearing the same responsibilities. 

Our first year was a year of organization and experiment, 
nothing was "proved, we had to be continually trying new things, 
and yet the year was a great success.. The girls were still 
filled with the enthusiasm with which Mary Leavens had in- 
spired them and with which Frances Hughes continued to in- 
flame them. 

The second period was a time for the realization of the experi- 
ments, some were found to turn out well, some had to have new 
things substituted for them. In that year also, the machinery- 
got into working order and things began to run smoothly and 
that year Kate Lord put her heart into the work of making 
Student Government better than it had ever been before. 

This third year is the beginning of the usual order and there- 
fore we shall all find it a critical year. We face the danger this 
year, because we have not many new things to occupy our at- 
tention, of allowing Student Government to become a mere 
routine, left to the officers and not supported by the enthusiasm 
of the entire Association. That is the thing which we must not do. 
We must not allow Student Government to mean to us nothing 
more than a mere machine for preserving order. We must 
realize how girls have longed for it, and worked for it. We 
must know that it means to us our independence and above all, 
we must feel for Student Government a deep and sincere en- 
thusiasm. (Continued on Page 4.) 



Shoes for College Girls 

I "till unci Winter 4»tylc;« in till 
I_,©titl"iei-« now reticJy. 

We «r© sole Boston A-jjcsnts for 

"La France" $3.00 Shoes. 
Thayer, Rogers & Norton, 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 



Ladies' Shirt and 
Golf Waists 

Made from Madras. Imported Cheviots, French Percales, 
English and French Flannels, Wash Silks, Serges, 
Butcher Linen, Pique, Mercerized Cheviots and Vestings, 
Silk Albertros, Silks and Satins, 

$6.SO to $50.00 

For Ladies and Misses 

Street Costumes, Evening Wraps, Street Coats and 
Skirts, Driving Coats, Golf or Outing Suits. 

Ladies' Sweaters, $3.00 to $12. OO 

Ladies' Heavy Street Gloves 

in all the new shades, 

S1.50 to $2.50 

NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Sts., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 

STolpt Hill School for Girls, 

NATICK, MASS. 



Tuition and Board, $600.00 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 



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Young Ladies' Gowns, Coats and Wraps, 

Millinery, Hats, Underwear and Gloves 

OUR COMPLETE FALL AND WINTER STOCK NOW READY. 

We call special attention to a large assortment of DRESSES MADE IN OUR OWN WORKROOMS for School 
and Street Wear at very reasonable prices. 

202 to 216 Boylston Street and Park Square, Boston 



COLLEGE NEWS 



(Concluded from Page 3.) 
We must make this year a step forward in Student Govern- 
ment, we must make it a better year than either of the others 
have been. The very fact that things are no longer new makes 
this possible. We therefore appeal to you all to give your sup- 
port, to feel your individual responsibility and above all to have 
the good of Student Government at heart. 

Florence W. Hutsinpillar. 



FREE PRESS. 



The following article, written by Miss Kate Lord, President of 
the Student Government Association in 1902- 1903, appeared in 
the May issue of the College News. The editors reprint the arti- 
cle in this opening number for the benefit of the new students. 

Is Student Government in Wellesley College a success or a 
failure? The question seems hardly pertinent, so assured are 
we all of success; but after all, the system has been in existence 
only two years, and is hardly old enough not to be watched 
over, questioned and guarded. It is of noble birth; it came to 
us the child of ideals. How are we sending it forth? What 
heritage are we giving it for future years? Can we be content 
to pass it on no stronger than we found it ? If Student Govern- 
ment is really a success, must not the spirit be more devoted 
and the system more nearly perfect now, than at the beginning 
of the year ? 

Let us above all things be true. Let us look fairly and square- 
ly at the situation and dare to say, "At this point we have failed. 
At this very point we must succeed. Only by the recognition 
and strengthening of our weakness shall we have power." 

Our weak points are not far to seek: 

We have failed to keep the prescribed quiet. 

The problem of the Village is yet unsolved. There lie the 
bare, bold facts. How do we intend to meet them? 

Student Government, with the close of this year comes to the 
parting of the ways. Two paths lie before the child, and his 
choice of one or the other shall determine what manner of man 
he shall be. Next fall another class of three hundred or more 
new girls are coming to live in the Village. At least one-third 
of the Campus population will be made up of girls whose College 
life has so far been Village life, whose knowledge of the true 
Wellesley ideals is not deep enough to make them fit guardians 
of the new-comers. A great many of the Juniors, too, will have 
had only one year of real training. Of girls who were here at the 
inauguration of Student Government, who caught the first 
fire from off the altar, there will remain only 1904, who, loyal 
as they are, cannot, without backing, set the tone of the whole 
College. The situation is a grave one. Student Government's 
straight road is at an end; choice of paths is necessary. Shall 
we take the way of injured and surprised resignation, or shall 
we square our shoulders against the difficulties to be met, and 
resolve to conquer them? Shall we fall back into the easy 
jog-trot of Faculty Government, leaving the burden of care 
and responsibility to a few of our officers, carrying out the 
letter of the rules, — the spirit dead, — absorbed with techni- 
calities and the machinery of government, our eyes closed to 
the greater issues, the broad and deep ideals which made glad 
and worth while the labor and pain of bringing the cause to 
birth? Or should Student Government remain an inspired thing ? 

Why did Student Government come to be? Was it for the 
sake of privileges or for the sake of power? Was it that we 
might keep our lights on after 10, P. M., or that Freshmen 
might go to the theatre, that Mary Leavens thought and worked 
and hoped for years ? Was it for the attainment of a few privi- 
leges that 1901 and 1902 took up the work and brought it to 
fruition? Were the Faculty weary of holding the guiding lines, 
so that the trustees were glad to relieve them of responsibility ? 

Upon greater and graver grounds was our authority given us. 
We sought not privileges, but power. That we might succeed 
where Faculty rule had failed, that our houses might be better 
governed, that we might maintain the best conditions for schol- 
arly work, that we might grow in character and power, that 
we might promote deeper loyalty to the best interests of the 



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STICKNEY & SMITH, 

157 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



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Fkederic Forehand, 
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Hntique furniture 
an& Ifotstorical Cbina 

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Boston, Mass. 



Cafedes 
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fcv lf§?l • 




col 1. 1<: r, i<: n k w s 



College, thai we mighl go out fr Wclleslej finer, strongei 

more powerful women, thesi wen thi motive; which led us to 
ask for Student Government; these were the purposes which tin 
Trust res of our College thoughl worth) to be I red, 

We have received a sacred trust and we havi trii d to be faith- 
ful to it, Danger lies before us, We are pu1 to the proof, Are 
we equal to the emergency, or was the whole movement a mis- 
take? Shall Wellesley record one more failure in tin- history of 

Democracy, or shall she keep her place as leader among w ;n's 

colleges? There is no half-way mad. Can we strengthen our 
two weak points? Can we acknowledge the difficulties in our 
way. and surmount them? Certain Campus houses are con 
fessedly hard in govern. Shall we say. "Tney were just as bad 
under Faculty rule," and be contenl to leave it so? Or shall we 
accept the difficulty as an opportunity of proving ourselves 
equal to our trust' Is our devotion subject to limitations, or 
do we care enough for the soul of Student Government to make 
it conquer at all odds? 

Can we solve the problem of the Village? Will the Village 
girls themselves undertake its solution? Granted that they 
are handicapped by living off the Campus, that they are not 
swept along by the general movement, can they even yet, as 
Wellesley women, prove that the honor system is the right one? 
All plans in regard to the new Village dormitory, all sacrifice 
and devotion of upper class girls who arc going to the Village to 
live, will not suffice unless the Freshman class, along with equal 
rights, has also pride and loyalty equal to that of any other 
class. 

With what heritage shall Student Government go from our 
hands? It is for us, in these last few weeks, to choose. The 
challenge of these questions is to every student, from Graduates 
to Sub-freshmen. Shall we meet it fairly? Shall we take the 
path of mechanical following of our rules? Is the Spirit of 
Student Government dead? Kate Imogen Lord, 1903. 



TRAINING FOR SOCIAL SERVICE. 



There is an increasing demand for College graduates in the 
philanthropic field. Not only in the organized charities and 
in settlement work but in municipal institutions and in the 
service of the state, there is increasing opportunity for well 
equipped women to find congenial employment. The Colleges, 
for their part, are making provision for the training of social 
workers. The study of the dependent , defective and delinquent 
classes, of the causes of poverty, intemperance and crime and 
of the methods of dealing with each is accorded a place in the 
department of economics, but the College class-room cannot 
furnish practical experience. Such study of social ills and 
means of relief must of necessity be theoretical. Before under- 
taking a responsible position as associated charity agent or 
probation officer, etc., the college graduate should, if possible, 
secure special training. Preliminary experience is even more 
important for the social worker than for the school teacher — in 
both vocations the well-being of human souls is involved, but 
in the case of the social servant, there is no foreordained system 
and no superintendent to direct one's work and correct one's 
mistakes before they do harm. The would-be philanthropist 
must learn how to swim before going into the water. 

A brief account of some of the more important opportunities 
for training in social service may be of use to women seeking 
employment in this field. 

The Wellesley Alumna? Association in conjunction with the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, and the College Settle- 
ments Association has undertaken to maintain a sociological 
fellowship. The stipend is to be S400.00 for a year's time, and 
the fellow is to combine practical with theoretical work. It is 
hoped that this fellowship will be available in 1904 and 1905. 
Radeliffe and Columbia are already offering similar fellowships. 
The Associated Charities of Boston have for several years past 
provided a systematic course of study in connection with 
practical service. These "agents in training" receive salaries 
of from S500 to S800 according to experience gained. The 
Charity Organization Society of New York City has conducted a 



NOTE! 



Wellesley Students will find 

WRIGHT (SL DITSON'S STORE, 

344 Washington Street, Boston, 

An ideal place to purchase Athletic Supplies. They have the best 
and latest goods for each pastime: FIELD HOCKEY, TENNIS, 
GOLF, BASKET BALL, FENCING. SKATES, SKATING and 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

Wright & Ditson are getting out a catalogue exclusively for ladies, 
which will be sent free to any address. 



C. F. HOVEY & CO. 

Importers and Retailers of Dry Goods 

Dress Goods, Silks, Linens, Gar- 
ments, Underwear, Gloves, Laces, 
Ribbons. 

RtiSS AND FaRNISRINGS 

For College 'Rooms. 



BOSTON PARIS 

33 Summer and 42 Avon Streets 12 Rue Ambroise Thomas 

CLOAKS. FURS. 

G. Wildes S mith 

STUDENTS' SAILOR SUITS 

Cheviot Serges, $12.50 White Drill, $10.50 
Storm Serges, 15.00 Colored Linen, 15.00 

Ready to Wear, or Made to Order. 

Heavy Cotton Vesting Shirt Waists, 

$3.00 and upwards. 

FURS, NECKWEAR, TAILORED COATS 
AND SUITS. 



Discount to Wellesley and Dana Hall Students. 



155 Tremont vStreet 



WAISTS. 



New Hotel Bellevue 



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CENTRAL LOCATION 



BEACON STREET, near TREMONT 

boston, mass. 

Harvey & Wood 



COLLEGE NEWS 



HIGH 

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DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS. 



IowKe-Ys 



CHOCOLATES 
SO and 60c per lb. 



DELICIOUS -DAINTY-PURE. 

146 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. ) 



PICTURES FRAMED 

— AT — 

Mrs. H. E. Curriers' 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ. Dental School) 

Shattuck's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9-12 and 2-5- 



SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
ery- 

MARY L. MORAN, 
Dress/naK' 1 ??' 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest Fast?ior>5, 



GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume Parlors, 

17 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes lor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

John 7V Morgan & Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 



"Tom" Griffin, ™ L l s e t sL E y 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
for evening trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE TKANSFEBHED. 
TELEPHONE 101-5. 

James Korntved, 



Shaw Block, Room 1, 

wellesley square. 



H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, Sta- 
tionery, Etc. 

Wright & Ditson's Sporting Goods 
Waban Block, Wellesley So. 



summer school in Philanthropic Work — this is now to be ex- 
panded into a winter course under the direction of Mrs. Anna 
Garlin Spencer. 

'the office of tenement-house agent or tenement-house in- 
spector under the Board of Health is one to which women are 
admirably adapted. It requires, in addition to good com- 
mon sense and the ability to get on with smells and dirt, some 
practical knowledge of sanitation. This may be had from a 
College course such as is offered at the Institute of Technology, 
but it may also be derived from a good course of reading and a 
tour of inspection taken under the guidance of a good plumber. 

Simmons College, Boston, and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 
offer courses intended to fit for practical service. The courses 
in domestic science, for example, are essential to the successful 
conduct of cooking classes or kitchen gardens. Simmons Col- 
lege proposes an interesting experiment in a course designed to 
fit women for secretarial positions. The college graduates may 
secure a diploma in one or two years. Another interesting 
field of work is suggested by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg, 
where the Library School is especially designed to equip for work 
in children's libraries, home libraries, etc. 

A quite recent opening is the teaching of nature study classes 
in vacation schools and the direction of school gardens. College 
courses in Botany and Zoology would be of great use as a basis 
for such work, but special pedagogic training may also be had. 
A training course is offered by the Boston Normal School, and 
the new course in Horticulture offered by the Wellesley Bo- 
tanical Department has this object in view. 

Other opportunities for philanthropic service for appropriate 
training will suggest themselves to the earnest, wide-awake 
woman. A hospital course is essential to the District Nurse, a 
Kindergarten course furnishes a valuable equipment for work in 
school play-grounds and children's sanitariums. A woman 
with a B. L. degree could render very effective service as police 
matron, probation officer, or as children's advocate in a juvenile 
court. 

The Economics Department will be glad to furnish as far as 
may be possible addresses and detailed information to any Wel- 
lesley graduate desiring to fit herself for any form of scoial serv- 
ice. Katharine Coman. 

COLLEGE NOTES. 

September 19, 7.30 P. M., Christian Association Reception. 
September 20, 11.00 A. M., service in Houghton Memorial 

chapel. Sermon by Rev. Lincoln Goodrich, D. D. 

4.00 P. M., address by Miss Reynolds, World's Secretary 

Y. W. C. A., in College Hall chapel. 

7.00 P. M., vespers. 
September 24, 7.30 P. M., the Christian Association mid-week 

prayer meeting, College Hall chapel. 
September 26, 7.30, P. M., Barnswallows. 
September 27, 11.00 A. M., services in Houghton Memorial 

chapel. Sermon by Rev. Rockwell H. Potter of Hartford, 

Conn. 

7.00 P. M., vespers with special music. 
September 28, 7.30 P. M., Freshman Concert. Albion Male 

Quartet assisted by Mr. Jacques Hoffman, in College Hall 

chapel. 
September 29, 4.15 P. M., annual meeting of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association in College Hall chapel. 

DIED. 

August 11, 1903, at Cornwall, New York, Mrs. Mary Frances 
Sherwood, mother of Miss Margaret Sherwood. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Chartered 1902. 

COTRELL & LEONARD, Albany, N. Y. 

Makers of the Caps, Gowns and 

Hoods to the American Colleges 

and Universities. 




ed Bulletins 



apphcatir 



Annie W. Stocking, (Wellesley '02) in charge of 
correspondence, may be addressed as above. 
WELLESLEY AND OTHER HOODS. 

B. A., $3.50 to $ 8.50; desirable, $ 5.50 

M. A., .... 6.75 " 16.50; " 10.50 

Ph. D. ... 8.50 " 22.00; " 13.50 



R. H. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

loot imatcr ans Steam JHcatcrs, 

Scaler in Stoves, IRanaes, HarSware, 

paints, Oils, Etc. 

Wellesley, Muss. 

Established 1875. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 

Wellesley Square. 

Qassius (IV Jiall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 

and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Stalls 1 3 & 1 5 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 
HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

LADIES' DESKS, 

MORRIS CHAIRS, 
Filled Screens, Bamboo Tea 
Tables and Bookshelves. 

College Souvenir China. 
CLELAND & UNDERWOOD, 

7 TO 13 W. CENTRAL ST., NATICK. 
Free Delivery. 



FALL OPENING 

-OF— 

French Pattern Hats, 

In all the Latest Designs, also' 
a good line of Fine Neckwear. 

Miss H. W. Murray, 

raellesles So,., TOcUeslcs, ftoass. 



COL U E C E N E W S 



LIST OF NEW STUDENTS, 1903. 

CORRECTED SEPTEMBER 2.1, I9O3. 

The following is a list of all new students entering thi 
College this fall: 



Abercrombie, Esthi 

G, 
von Ach, Katharin 

F. 
Ackerly, Jennie H 
Adams, Bessie ('. 
A, lams. Olive L. 
Aiken, Jean \ 
Alexander, Elizabeth Crawford , Amu 



r Clement , Laura 

Cole, Manon I. 
• Collins, Anna I ', 
Cooke, Jessie 1'. 
Coombe, Mary E. 
Cooper, Mabel 
Couch, Can line \ 
Crane, Daphru 



M 



Crawford, Marian 



Alexander, Man H. Dakin, Margaret 

W . 
Allen, Barbara 
Allen, Theresa A. 
Alley, Elisabeth B 



Heath, Margarel A 
Heber, fessie E. 
[-Ielmboldt, Henri- 
etta E 
Henderson, Nellie t 
Hendrie, Mabel I, 
Herrick, Grace 
Hersey, Ethel L. 
Hill, Avis W, 
Hill, Jean McC. 
Hoge, Virginia K. 



Davics. ('.race Mar-1 loopcr, Ethel S. 

tha Houghton, Ellen M. 

Davis, Kk'anor M. 



Ash. Geneva L. 
Harbour. Esther II. 

Barkla.yr. Edith A. 
Bascom, Louise R. 



Houghton, Harriet 

M. 
Hovey, Sila M. 
Howard, Leantha B 



Dietz, Marjorie 

Dill, Helen B. 
Dodge, Esther M 

Doonan, Rose LouiseHoyt, Clara R. 

Doten, Gladys Hull, Ethel M. 

Batchelder, Helen G. Douglas, Almira H. Hutchins, Helen W. 
Hates. Helen W. Downey, Helen M. Hutchins, Mary S. 
Beale, Olive M. Dungan, Margaret E.Hyde, Lydia W. 

Bean, fosephine 0. Dustin, Helen C. Hyndman, Ruth 

Beardsley, EleanorM.Dyer, Bertha W. 
Bechtcl, Gladys H. Eaton, F. Louisa 

Edwards, Marian 

Ehrhart, Lila M. 

Ellison, Edith . 

Emerson, Ruth N. 

Engel, Florence L. 

Fenwick, Jennie F. 

Fiske, Marie E. 

Flaccus, Alice C. 



Irwin, Constance 
Jackson, Florence 

Elizabeth 
Johnson, Carrie P. 
Kasson, Margaret C 
Kellogg, Sara L. 
Kent, Ruth D. 
Kenworthy, Ada L. 
Kimball, Grace L 
Kimball, Laura L. 
Florence King, Ethel 
L. King, Grace C. 

Foster, Pauline Kingsbury, Alberta 

Fox, Anna E. Snowies, Helen S. 

French, Helen S. Knox, Leila C. 

French, Ruth D. Lang, Helena S. 

Brady, Catherine E. Frick, Geraldine R. Lathrope, Eunice 
Brenneman, Mariana Fricke, Eleanor F. Leavitt, Mildred B 

H. Garford, Louise E 

Brenneman, Mary Garson, Hilda 

Edith Gilbert, Carrie F. 

Bridgens, Elizabeth Gilkey, Mabel E 



Bennett, Helen E. 

Bent, Addie H. 

Berry, Marian W. 

Besse, Florence F 

Bickford, Annie E 

Biddle, Marie 

Birge, Marguerite 

Bixby, Emma S. 

Blackmar, Helen M. Flewellin 

Blaisdell, Ruth J. 

Boxrud, Helen M. 

Boyle . Helen 

Bradfield, Maude C 

Bradt, Alice H. 



Brown, Hattie 

Browne, Eva G. 

Browne, Lillian 

Bruner. Marion, E. 

Bryant, Florence 

Bucher, Rosana 

Buchler, Emma A. 

Burr, Minnie 

Burton, Sybil 

Buzbv, Ella H. 

Cabell, Clara W. 

Cain, Ruth C. 

Callaway, Grace 

Campbell, Elsie 

Carothers, Ruth A. 

Carter, Caroline L 

Castle, Elizabeth M.Hayes, Julia P 

Cate, Gertrude C. Hazlett, Mary J. 

Clark, Florence Healey, Frances 

Clark, Lida Healy, Bertha V 



Leonard, Mildred A. 

Levy, Theresa 

Lewis, Evanelle 

Lines, Louise S. 

Logan, Marjorie S. 

Loomis, Vera 

Lorenz, Helen B. 

Lovell, Rhodica J. 

Ludlow, Hattie 

McCausey. Elcy T. 

McCrum, Helena D. 

McDougall, Mary 

MacKellar, Marguer- 
ite B. 
Madeline MacKinnon, Flora I. 

McManus, Rose R. 

Mallory, Laura H. 

Margerum, Eliza- 
beth M. 



Gilmore, Helen M. 
Goddard, Helen M 
Gold, Caroline L. 
Goodman, Julia M. 
Goodrich, Nellie H 
Gregory, Abbie W. 
Griffin, Clara A. 
Hague, Abbie S. 
Hague, Mary R. 
Hanna, Alice M 
Hanson 
McC. 
Harding, Anna T 
Hardy, Mary J. 
Harvey, Alice G. 

Hastings, Minnie K. Marks, Helen G. 
Hawkins, Helen M. Maxwell, Mary D 



May, Mary B. 
Medlar, Reba N. 
Millikan, Louise A, 
Mitchell, Mabel M. 



ARTISTIC CREATIONS 

Gold, Silver, Glass and China, 

POR GIFTS AISD PRIZES. 

Also Umbrellas and Opera. Glasses. 

STRONGHOLD $1.00 TO $10.00. 




%aiMA&A>^ 



24 Winter Street, Boston 



Your mantel piece looks bare, lo 
There's Lots of room to spare, love, 

( Mi desk and wall and book-case shelf, on conch and 
table, too; 

But heave not such a sigh, h 1 • 
Though first-floor walls be high 1" 1 

But take the train to Boston Town, and .sec what 

HATCH 

can do. 
Or, if your ticket-book's low, love, and you think 
the train too slow, love, why, wait till the 

WELLESLEY MAGAZINE 

in just a day or two, hangs out a poster gay, love, on 
which the artists say, love, that 

WALTER M. HATCH'S 

goods will be on sale in the Senior Parlor, and then — 
you know what you can do. 





NATICK, MASS. 



Headquarters for Wellesley 

College Seal Fob Charms 

and Pins. 

JEWELERS. 



A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats, Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques, Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 



WILLIAM LEAVENS & GO., 



32 Canal Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 




o 

o 



COLLEGE NEWS 



NEW STUDENTS— Continued. 



Mitchell, Sarah B. 
Moore, Louise 
More, Betty T. 
Morrill, Helen T. 
Morse, Helen B. 
Morse, Mary H. 
Moseley, Mary G. 
Murphy, Mary A. 
Neely, Mary R. 
Newell, Helen A. 



Shull, Mary M. Washburn, Gcnc- 

Shupp, Mary R. vieve 

Silliman, Henrietta Watt, Ethel 11. 

Simmons, Sara I. Watterworth, Kath- 

Small, Harriet S. leenW. 

Smith, Katharine Weaver, Florence C. 

Augusta Weaver, Katharine 

Smith, Marion Ellis Weaver, Mildred 
Smith, Mildred Eve- Wheeler, Mary P. 



lyn 



White, Frances B. 
White, Gertrude 
White, Ruth 
Whiting, Lavinia I. 
Whitney, Marion E. 
Wilbur, Nina G. 
Williams, Lucile 
Williams, Mabel A. 
Witherell, Nina 0. 
Witte, Mabel 
Wolfe, Carolyn 



Phraner, Olive 
Pickett, Marie 
Pierce, Hazel E. 
Pinney, Jean E. 
Piatt, Louise 



Nickerson, Roma S. Smith, Olive Anne 

Noble, Hebe H. Somers, May 

Norris, Janet M. Spicer, Mollie 

Noyes, Helen G. Spitz, May 

Noyes, Margaret E. Stark, May S. 

O'Connor, May Stevens, Ruth F. 

Osborne, Mae Stickney, Alice 0. 

Page, Mary R. Stone, Mabel A. 

Palmer, Lillian Storey, Dorothy H. 

Parker, Gladys Strout, Letty A. 

Pastene, Teresa E. M. Strong, Marguerite Wood, Edith Helen 

Perry, Alice C. Stuart, Theresa C. Wood, Helen Mar- 

Stubbins, Una 

Studley, Marian H. 

Sulzbacher, Rita 

Sutton, Florence J. 

Swanton, Bertha M. 
Plummer, Florence Sweet, Marion E. 

P. Taber, Mary 

Potter, Lena R. Tapley, Margaret 

Price, Fanny A. Tasker, Madge S. 

Prichard, Eunice G. Thayer, Maud P. 
Proctor, Katharine Thomas, Ethel M. 
W. Tillotson, Jean R. 

Prouty, Geraldine S.Timberlake, Nellie G.Hunt, Lillian M. 
Pryor, Naoma M. Titus, Alice F. Knox, Carrie L. 

Questrom, Thetis G.Tobey, Katharine H. McLennan, Alice 
Raymond, Alice P. Tuttle, Gladys M. MacMurray, Jessie A. 

Van Dervoort, Win-Macy, Katharine H. 
ifred F. Matheson, Winifred 

Van Noorden, Flora Middleton, Eliza E. 
R. Moore, Harriet 

Volquardson, Anna Shaw, Caroline N. 
M. Thomas, Laura 

Wackenhuth, Elsa Vaughan, Ethel S. 

Waldo, Elisabeth Woodward, Ethel A. 
Russell, Mabelle M. Walworth, Florence 
Rust, Louise B. E. Specials. 

Sanborn, Alice D. Wanamaker. Netta Buchanan, Jessie 
Sanderson, Ruth G. L. Dailey, Mary Olive ■ 

Scott, Adeline M. Ward, Edith A. Edson, Edith 

Searcy, Edith L. Warner, Mabel L. Hood, Helen G. 

Sherman, Frances E Warren, Marie J. 



garet 
Wood, Helen Porter 
Wrigley, Abby L. 

Advanced Standing. 
Bentley, Helen E.' 
Currey, Rachel 
Daley, Leoline M. 
DeBow, Emma G. 
Delano, Louise C. 
Fellows, Gladys E. 
Guise, Helen L. 



Rand, Adelaide A. 
Reed, Helen F. 
Roberts, Alice W. 
Roberts, May 
Rogers, Ada 
Rogers, Mildred M, 
Rossington, Alice 
Russell, Jean 



Perkins, Emma A. 



Theatrical Notes. 

Hollis Street Theatre — Julia Marlowe in "Fools of Nature" 
Globe Theatre : — "John Ermine of the Yellow Stone." 
Colonial Theatre — "The Silver SHpper." 

HERRICK'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, NEAR BACK BAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Telephone 60S or 950. 



Chickering Pianos 

o 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 



Chickering £&f Sons 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Meyer Jonasson & Co, 



Tremont and Boylston Streets 



Fashion Originators 

Offer Walking Suits of the newest fab- 
rics, in " styles that you do not see else- 
where/' long coat effects that are new 
and distinctive, 



$20 



Guaranteed values, 

$25 $30 $37.50 



E. T. SLATTERY CO. 

NeW WalRirig vSuitS of Fine Imported Mixtures 
Ne\V Veiling DreSSeS from the latest Paris Models 

NEW FRENCH MILLINERY AND NECHWEAR. 

We recommend the Fairfax Linen Waist to Wellesley College Girls. 
154 and 155 Tremont Street, Boston 



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